Giving a Hero His Due

I was recently sent a copy of a book to preview, and just today ordered a class set of them for my classroom for next year!

Dog Diaries #4: Togo by Kate Klimo is a fantastic story of Togo who, according to many historians, should get the mostdownload credit for the success of the 1925 Serum Run into Nome.  Balto was the lead dog who carried the serum into town, but Togo was the lead for the longest leg of the relay, almost double the length of any other team!  The story is told from Togo’s point of view, which honestly usually rubs me the wrong way, but this one is really well done!  Togo has a lot of spunk, energy, and determination.  I think the book will be great for talking about visualization with readers… it’s easy to see many of Togo’s pre-serum run antics in your mind!  The appendixes are full of extra information too.  I was thrilled to see that the appendix talks about the Iditarod without claiming the race commemorates the Serum Run!  Instead, it makes the connection between the two via the history of the trail, which to me is the perfect way to do it!  The book is recommended for grades two to five.  I think it will be a fairly easy read for my third graders, so perfect for the beginning of the year.

I’m thinking that I will pair this book with my unit on Stone Fox (LINK) next year.  I think there will be many good connections made between the two books.  Throw Mush! Sled Dogs of the Iditarod (LINK) in there as a non-fiction text and I think I will have the perfect little trilogy of sled dog stories to start my year and set the tone and ignite the passion for following the race!

If you have a couple of weeks of school left, grab Dog Diaries #4: Togo as a quick read aloud.  Or, grab a copy for yourself to preview for next year.  Later this summer, keep an eye on the Iditarod Education Portal. I will post my unit plans there for anyone who is interested!

Tales from the Trail: Special Delivery

This year, two mushers will be carrying special packages on their sleds to make a special delivery in Nome.

In order to promote vaccine awareness, Martin Buser and Aliy Zirkle will carry vaccine from Anchorage to Nome.  Vaccines are given to children to help prevent various diseases.  This event is being organized by Lisa Schobert, Vaccine Coordinator and Dawn Sawyer, PA.  The I DID IT BY TWO: Race To Vaccinate program has been working hard to encourage people to have their children immunized.  The program has done several events to promote their cause including providing dog jackets for the Iditarod race dogs on start day, giving families mushing themed charts to track their immunizations, and many more.  The I DID IT BY TWO slogan is to remind families:

I  – Iditarod

DID – Did you know that children need 80% of their childhood vaccines by age 2?

IT – It can seem a little complicated keeping up with recommended immunizations, but the payoff is big!

BY – by immunizing your children on-time by age…

TWO!

Lisa tells me that she chose Martin Buser to help with the project because he has worked with the I DID It By Two group before and is a great spokesman for the campaign.  He will be carrying the DTAP.  This vaccine is given to children between the ages of  two months and six years.  The DTAP is a vaccine given to children to prevent diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough).  The organizers think that with Martin’s playful personality, he may actually pass the vaccines off to other mushers to carry down the trail!  That would be in keeping with the spirit of the original serum run which was actually a relay.

Aliy Zirkle was asked to participate because Lisa wanted a front line contender, and with second place finishes in the last two races, Aliy certainly meets that criteria.  Knowing how competitive she is, Aliy will most likely put the vaccine in her sled and run her race!  She will be carrying Tdap vaccine which is used for adolescents and adults.  Tdap stands for tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis and is used for people aged seven and older.

Each musher will get a box of ten vials to transport and they can package them however they would like to.  Each box weighs 2.3 ounces.  This made me think of the classic, “Can you package an egg and drop it off the roof?” science experiment.  So here’s a little Iditarod themed twist on that activity:  Protect that Vaccine

Here are some photos to share with your kids to show what the vials will look like:

The temperatures that the vaccines are stored at are very, very important.  If the vaccines are not kept between 35-46 degrees F they cannot be given to patients.  Lisa explained to me that if the refrigerator door is left open or someone goes in and out of the refrigerator a lot, the inside temperature can be affected.  They use a Data Logger to continually monitor the temperatures of the vaccines as they travel from one location to another.  The logger, which is similar to a thumb drive, can record temperatures for fifty-six days. Then when the vaccines and logger arrive at their final location, the data can be loaded onto the computer and the temperature information can be displayed in a graph form.  My class has been given a data logger to experiment with, but you can replicate this with a basic thermometer and a refrigerator at home or school:  Keeping the Vaccines Cold

Obviously, to many people, the Iditarod has come to serve as a reminder of the 1925 Serum Run.  That was not Joe Redington, Sr.’s main objective though. His main goals in establishing the race were to project the sled dogs and their role in the culture of Alaska and to save the historic Iditarod Trail.  The Serum Run definitely has a huge role in the history of Alaska and the history of the Iditarod Trail, so it’s kind of neat to see this event as a way to bring the message of the importance of immunizations to villages on the trail.  Here is more on the history of the race and the reasons it started from Katie Mangelsdorf:  Bustingmyth

The go-to picture book for kids to learn about the Serum Run is the Great Serum Race by Debbie Miller.  You can also join the Cleveland Museum of Natural History for a Distance Learning Program about Balto. I wrote about that here: LINK

The Cleveland Museum of Natural History has a great PDF file you could print to give some kids the story behind the Serum Run.  It even has a picture of the original vials to compare to the ones Zirkle and Buser will be carrying this year:  LINK

Here’s a Venn Diagram you could use to compare the Serum Run with the modern trip the vaccines will be taking with Aliy and Martin this year.  VennDiagram

For a writing piece, students could write and record radio spots, like public service announcements for the I DID IT BY TWO Campaign.

The official Press Release is here:  January Press Release – Vaccine

You can learn more about this project here:  LINK

I will have more information soon about other mushers who are “mushing for a cause” or using their Iditarod runs to bring awareness about causes near and dear to their hearts!

The Juniors Have a Starting Order!

What do GPS Trackers, trail markers, pizza, trail stakes, dog tags, race bibs, pictures, and dog booties have in common? 

They all had featured roles in tonight’s Junior Iditarod meeting.

After sharing some pizza, signing some autographs, and having some pictures taken, the juniors got started on their final meeting before hitting the trail tomorrow morning.

As I’ve gone into schools to share this week, one of the things I’ve been talking to the kids about is the setting of the Iditarod and wondering with such a long race, how on earth do the mushers know where they are?  The kids have come up with lots of ideas – they can tell by the landmarks, the checkpoints, the dogs know  – but tonight the junior mushers and  I  got to hear all about how the trail is marked for the Junior Iditarod from the Trail Boss.

2014-02-21 22.45.24The trail is marked with stakes that have bright orange paint at the top and are labeled with JRI for Junior Iditarod.  The trail markers may be a half mile to a mile apart, but they are within sight of each other.  The kids were told if they can’t see the next trail marker, they may want to stop and think about where they are!  If they see two markers together on one side of the trail, they know that they need to turn in direction.  They only have wide sweeping turns, no right angle turns on this trail.  If they see two stakes crossed like an “x” that means “don’t go this way!”  The coolest thing about the trail markers?  Each junior was given one to keep as a souvenir!  Their special stakes even have the Junior Iditarod logo on them.  Since they got their own to keep, the kids were encouraged NOT to take them from the trail!

The trail this year will be slightly shorter than normal due to the change in starting location.  The juniors will travel 62 miles out, take their ten hour layover at Yentna Station, and then travel 62 miles back in.  The kids were glad to hear that the trail still covers part of the Iditarod Trail, so they can officially tell people they have “raced the Iditarod Trail.”  The Trail Boss described the trail as fast, but luckily it is all frozen, so there is on open water at all.

Probably the most exciting thing for the kids was the start order draw.  The kids were called to the front in the order 2014-02-21 23.03.07they signed up for the race, so our friend Nicole Forto got to draw first.  She drew number six.  No one drew number one, as that space is saved for an honorary musher.

Here’s the starting order and a little bit about each musher:

1 – Ceremonial Musher

2 – Jimmy Lanier – Jimmy is sixteen years old and a junior at Chugiak High School.  His dad, Jim, has run the Iditarod fifteen times!  This is his second Junior Iditarod.  He also plays baseball.

3 – Josh Klejka – Josh is seventeen years old and is a junior at the high school in Bethel.  He finished eighth in the Junior Iditarod in 2012.  He also runs cross country.

4 – Conway Seavey – Conway is seventeen and is an eleventh grade homeschool student.  He has finished the Junior Iditarod three times and won in 2012.  He is also a very talented singer and songwriter.

5 – Andew Nolan – Andrew is fourteen years old and is a ninth grade homeschooler.  He’s been training for the past two years with an Iditarod veteran.

6 – Nicole Forto –  Nicole is sixteen years old and is a junior at Houston High School in Willow, Alaska.  In addition to mushing, she owns Wickes Sweets Baking Company.

7 – Janelle Trowbridge – Janelle is sixteen years old and was born in Michigan.  She and her family moved to Nome, Alaska in 2009.  She is a junior at Nome Beltz High School.  She also runs and skis for her school’s biathlon team.

8 – Kevin Harper – Kevin is fifteen and is a sophomore at Wasilla High School. This will be his first race!  In addition to mushing he wrestles.

9 – Ashley Guernsey – Ashley is a fourteen year old eighth grader at Seward Middle School in Moose Pass, Alaska.  In addition to mushing she runs cross country and track.

10 – Ben Harper – Ben is seventeen and is a senior at Wasilla High School.  This will be his third time running the Junior Iditarod.

Tomorrow is the big day!  The mushers have to be at Happy Trails Kennels by 9am and the race officially gets underway at ten am.  Best of luck to all of this year’s Junior Iditarod Mushers!  See you on the trail!

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Tales from the Trail: Neither Rain, Sleet, Nor Snow The Mail Must Go

“Always striving to find ways to get the trail recognized, another idea was hatched at one of the many meetings.  The Iditarod Trail was a mail trail, so why not have each musher carry mail?  An arrangement was made with the U.S. Postal Service to carry cachets, packets of letters, over the Iditarod to Nome.  Joe [Redington, Sr.] asked his artist friend, Bill Divine, if he would design an Iditarod Trail Logo for the envelopes.  These would be postmarked in Anchorage and Nome and used as a fund-raising project.

At a prerace meeting this idea was presented to the mushers.  Surprisingly, it was met with some resistance.  There was already enough to do.  Carrying mail was too much to ask.  Joe did not react, he responded in a good way, and came up with a solution – ‘I’ll carry yours,’ was all he said.

‘He was one of a kind,’ said Norman.  ‘Joe had such a unique, easy way of looking at things.’

His positive attitude turned the whole negative thought around.  To have the U.S. Postal Service support the Iditarod Race added credibility, recognition, and needed funds.  And Devine’s logo became the official Iditarod logo.”

From:  Champion of Alaskan Huskies by: Katie Mangelsdorf

 

This summer I had the opportunity to be a member of the Teach it Forward Program with the Smithsonian American History Museum.  During the program, we learned strategies for teaching with objects as a way to get kids to relate to history.  Our challenge was to choose an object in the museum’s collection and develop a lesson around it.  I was really excited to join this program – and I had visions of getting to see and work with the Libby Riddles sled, and DeeDee Jonrowe’s humanitarian award and coat. I know that these objects are a part of the Smithsonian’s collection, as I had a chance to meet Jane Rogers, the curator of sports, last winter when she came to the Iditarod Conference for Educators to learn about the race and gather objects for an upcoming display.   You can read more about Jane and the upcoming exhibit here:    http://finalistsforteacheronthetrail.wordpress.com/jennifers-journal/monday-evening/

This second link includes an activity that challenges the students to decide what objects they would place in the Smithsonian’s exhibit.  http://finalistsforteacheronthetrail.wordpress.com/2013/02/27/libbys-sled/

But, it turns out the Iditarod objects are still in storage and not ready for display yet. I was disappointed, but in a way, it turned out to be a really cool disappointment because it forced me to get more creative and I discovered something really cool!

It turns out that the Smithsonian has a second sled it its collection, an Alaskan mail sled, which is housed in the National Postal Museum.

My next challenge was to tie that sled in to the Iditarod, which I was able to do.  The Iditarod Trail was originally a mail trail and the modern mushers honor that history by carrying mail cachets down the trail every year.

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So I was able to use several objects in the Smithsonian’s collection: a sled, some photographs, and stamps and pair them with some Iditarod Trail Race mail cachets as the basis for an inquiry based lesson.  The lesson allows students to discover the connection between the Iditarod Race and the Iditarod Trail as a historic trail.  They also discover the reason why mail cachets are one of the mandatory items carried down the trail by the racers. It was a fascinating process. I learned a lot!  Special thanks to authors Katie Mangelsdorf and Helen Hegener who graciously allowed me to use portions of their books with this lesson.

Here are all the materials needed for the lesson… Enjoy!

Smithsonian Sled Lesson

Mail Sled Lesson Materials

Going North – The Rush Is On!

In September of 1898, the “Three Lucky Swedes” discovered gold on Anvil Creek, founded the Nome Mining District, and started a new rush to the North.  By 1898, Nome had a population of 10,000, many of whom had arrived for the Klondike Gold Rush.  When gold was discovered on the beaches of Nome, the rush was on and thousands more people poured into Nome.  By 1900 a tent city on the beaches reached for thirty miles from Cape Rodney to Cape Nome.

The Nome Gold Rush was different from other rushes due to the ease with which the gold could be obtained.  It was literally lying on the beaches!  Initially, the gold was gathered by panning.  Later in 1899 human powered slucies and rockers were employed.  By 1900 small machines with hoses and pumps were in place, and around 1902 big companies took over.  The mining season was short, claims could only be worked from June to October.

Nome City obviously still exists, and among other things, marks the end of the Iditarod Trail and the end of the Iditarod Sled Dog Race.  The estimated total amount of gold recovered from the area is thought to be around 112 metric tons.

We have been having our own gold rush in 3A.  We have been learning about the Alaskan Gold Rush and even did our own gold panning simulation!  I picked a chilly day and filled our buckets with freezing cold water just to make it a little more authentic!  It was great dirty fun!  In fact, one of the parents shared with me that his son has decided to move to Alaska and search for enough gold to start a kennel to train for the Iditarod!

Lesson Plan:  Going for the Gold

Balto Lives WHERE?

Did you know that Balto currently resides in the Cleveland Museum of Natural History?

After the famous Serum Run, Balto quickly achieved hero status and traveled all over North America.  Eventually Balto and his teammates were sold to a vaudeville show owner in California where they were mistreated.  George Kimble, a businessman from Cleveland discovered the dogs living in squalor and organized his hometown to save the dogs.  They were moved to the Cleveland Zoo where they were well loved for the rest of their days.  Today, Balto’s preserved body is on permanent display at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History… and in fact… a new display is being planned around Balto as we speak!

While there isn’t an Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race tie to Balto directly, there is definitely an Iditarod Historic Trail tie in… and it’s a wonderful story to boot!  Contrary to popular belief, the Iditarod race was never meant to commemorate the Serum Run of 1925 where the lifesaving diphtheria serum was carried to Nome by dog sled.  Joe Redington, Sr.  founded the race to both commemorate the Iditarod Historic Trail and to save the sled dogs who were being systematically replaced by snowmachines.

Still, the Serum Run is a part of Iditarod Trail History and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History has a wonderful distance learning program developed around Balto!  I introduced the story of the Serum Run to my boys with the book The Great Serum Race:  Blazing the Iditarod Trail by Debbie S. Miller.  This book has amazingly beautiful pictures by Official Iditarod artist, Jon Van Zyle.  We also talked about the idea that many people believe the Iditarod race is based on this historic event, but we reviewed Joe Redington, Sr.’s real motivation for starting the race – preserving the huskies and the historic trail.

On our assigned day and time, we connected with the museum where our guest teacher Lee Gambol led us through the program.  We learned so much more than just the story of the Serum Run and how Balto ended up in Cleveland.  We learned about the difficulties the mushers faced, we learned about the art of taxidermy (Did you realize they take the animal’s skin off and put it over a sculpture of the animal?  I’m not sure what I thought happened, but that wasn’t it!), we learned about Balto’s life after the event, and some history of the time period.  It was fascinating for the students AND the teachers!

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When you make arrangements for your “trip” to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History they send you a big blue kit full of hands on materials to share with the kids.  The kit includes modern day attire (snowsuit, boots, gloves, hat) so that they can compare them to historic photos of the Serum Run mushers, a husky skull so that the students can look at the teeth to learn what kind of eaters the dogs are, booties and harnesses.  One of the harnesses is even people sized so that the kids can try it on and see what it feels like to pull!  It was great for showing the boys where the dogs feel the pull of the weight of the sled in their bodies.

We followed up the program just with a class discussion about Balto, but you could easily follow it up with a more in depth study or a writing assignment.  My kids are still convinced that Togo got the raw end of the fame deal! Togo by Roger J. Blake is a great book to share for Togo’s story.   We also had a fascinating discussion of the Disney movie Balto and why so much was changed for the movie.  Just look at the pictures The Real Balto (picture link) and the Disney Balto (picture link).  The biggest change as far as the boys were concerned was that Balto actually never had any offspring. He was “fixed” early on because he wasn’t viewed to be a great enough dog to breed!

You can find more information or book your Distance Learning Trip here:  http://www.cmnh.org/site/ClassesandPrograms/SchoolPrograms/AtYourSchool/DistanceLearning/CMNH.aspx

Timing It All Out

We have officially begun our school year in 3A!  Here are some pictures of my final classroom set up… I hope you enjoy them!

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This week we will be taking a look at timelines.  I have a timeline hanging in the classroom that takes up three walls of the room.  I introduce the idea of timelines to the kids by giving each team a set of cards with some “major” historical events on them (the writing of the Declaration of Independence, the founding of our school, the peak of immigration through Ellis Island which they studied in second grade, the sailing of the Mayflower, the first Iditarod race, etc.) and asking the students to put the events in chronological order.  The conversations that the boys have while trying to do the task are always a trip, as are their rationales for the order they settle upon.  Once they have them in order, I challenge the teams to put a date on the top of each card.  Once we discuss the accurate responses, we add them to our classroom timeline where they serve as anchor points.  Throughout the year, as we read about significant events or learn about them in Social Studies, we add them to the timeline.  The timeline provides a picture of how our studies time out in history. It helps the students make connections between time and place that they wouldn’t always see otherwise. I am often surprised at how close or how far apart events took place as well as by comparing what was happening in different parts of the world at the same time in history!

Here is a quick assignment sheet that could serve as an introduction or review of
setting up, reading, and interpreting timelines based on the events leading to the establishment of the Iditarod National Historic Trail.  I took my information from the Iditarod Historic Trail Visitor Guide that is published by Alaska Geographic which can be downloaded here:  http://www.alaskageographic.org/static/281/visitor-guide-download-page

As the Trail Turns