Musher Music Playlist

Music is enjoyed by so many people across the world.  From rock to pop, and country to classical, music is all around us.  Music can tell a story, convey a feeling, or simply help us relax.

img_3126The music in the Insider videos help us catch the feel of the race, while listening to Hobo Jim gets us pumped for the 1,000 mile race across Alaska.  Music can even be found at Matthew Failor’s 17th Dog kennel.  Failor said that music is a big part of his kennel, and he has speakers all over his dog yard.  Failor and his team enjoy listening to classic rock n’ roll and classic country and his team’s favorite song to jam out to is Space Oddity by David Bowie.

In this lesson your students will create a playlist for the Iditarod.  They will choose music based on its lyrics and/or feeling the music conveys.  They will choose 5 different songs which match up with 5 different checkpoints along the race.  Students will also explain why they chose each song in their playlist.

I began the lesson by pimg_3124laying 8-10 different songs (see the lesson plan for suggestions) and had my students discuss how the song made them felt (i.e. sad, happy, energized, mellow, etc.).  We then discussed how a song can make us feel and how we can use songs to describe how mushers might be feeling out on the Iditarod trail at specific checkpoints.  I had my class look at the southern route map (the route being used this year) to locate the different checkpoints.  I gave them my example playlist which is below.

Willow: Wake Me Up by Avicii
Rohn: Ain’t No Mountain High Enough by Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell
Iditarod: Beautiful Day by U2
Unalakleet: Fight Song by Rachel Platten
Nome: Eye of the Tiger by Survivor

This lesson was a bunch of fun, and my students loved picking songs and dancing around the classroom a bit.  When they were finished my students shared their playlists with their table group, and then we put them up in the hallway.  We also shared them with our music teacher who enjoyed reading why each student picked their songs.

Musher Music Handouts

Musher Music Lesson Plan

Other Iditarod Teacher News:

I am Skyping with classrooms across the country!  I have enjoyed taking my students on virtual field trips over the years, so I’m excited to work with you and your students to bring the Iditarod to life in your classroom.  To find more information and sign up for a time click here.  I will also be continuing the Iditarod Classroom Club with Skype which began last year with 2016 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail™ Laura Wright.  To join in the fun, click here: Iditarod Classroom Club.

Join us in Chicago for a conference on  January 21!  Speakers include Iditarod finisher Charley Bejna (via Skype), local musher Pat Moon, and 2017 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail (along with a few other Teachers on the Trail).  Click here for more information.

You can also join us in ALASKA!  The 2017 Winter Conference will be held February 28-March 3 in Anchorage, AK with the theme of “Making Sense of Problems and Persevering Through Them”.  Don’t miss the opportunity to learn from strong educators, and from the mushers themselves.  For more information on this conference click here.

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Winter Conference field trip to Matthew Failor’s kennel in 2016!

Honoring Our Veterans (and the Iditarod Connection)

dsc00796At first thought you may think there is no connection between the Iditarod, a sled dog race in Alaska, and Veterans Day, a day that honors those who have served in our country. However, there quite a few connections.

In this lesson your students will explore how they can use the gifts and talents they have to honor our US veterans this Veterans Day. This lesson was inspired by musher, Rick Casillo who has dedicated his life to helping our war veterans.  Casillo has finished the Iditarod six times, but his kennel has more than just a goal of racing the Iditarod.  His kennel, Battle Dawgs, has the added goal of raising awareness of combat veterans.  The mission of Battle Dawgs is to help combat veterans and empower them through therapeutic and exciting experiences in Alaska’s beautiful landscape using the healing power of sled dogs.

286101_158128761036389_619532534_oCasillo invites veterans up to the kennel to participate in various camps and day trips.  One of the camps is the “Iditarod Camp” in which veterans have the opportunity to help Rick prepare for the race, attend the start of the Iditarod, and fly out to a checkpoint along the race.  Casillo’s wife, Jennifer, is a combat veteran herself and she is still active as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Alaska Air National Guard.

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Two of my students after they completed writing down ways they can honor our veterans

Rick Casillo shares his talent and passion of mushing to help and honor the veterans of our country.  He gives of his time and makes certain that each veteran who visits his kennel feels loved and appreciated.  He helps them heal from the emotional toll of war, and allows them to experience Alaska and Iditarod in a most unique way.

Rick is an outstanding example of how each of us can use our gifts and talents to help and honor our country’s veterans.  Have your students take time to reflect on how they can give back to the veterans of your community.  Can you make them cards?  Share your gift of art? Share your gift of song? Perhaps read them a story you wrote.  How can you make a difference in a veteran’s life?

Veterans Day Reading Handouts

Veterans Day Writing Handouts

Veterans Day and Iditarod Connection Power Point

Veterans Day Iditarod Lesson Plan

Thank you to Rick and all who are involved in Battle Dawgs.  Your dedication to our US veterans is an inspiration to us all.  To learn more about Rick’s efforts, check out the Battle Dawgs website.

When doing this lesson with your students, you can also include information about the founder of the Iditarod, Joe Redington Sr, also being in the military.  Joe, along with many other past mushers, have bravely served our country.  To learn more about Joe Redington Sr., click here.

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Other Iditarod Teacher News:

I am Skyping with classrooms across the country!  I have enjoyed taking my students on virtual field trips over the years, so I’m excited to work with you and your students to bring the Iditarod to life in your classroom.  To find more information and sign up for a time click here.  I will also be continuing the Iditarod Classroom Club with Skype which began last year with 2016 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail™ Laura Wright.  To join in the fun, click here: Iditarod Classroom Club.

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Skyping with the Duluth Teacher Conference on November 5

Join us in Chicago for a conference on  January 21!  Speakers include Iditarod finisher Charley Bejna (via Skype), local musher Pat Moon, and 2017 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail (along with a few other Teachers on the Trail).  Click here for more information.

You can also join us in ALASKA!  The 2017 Winter Conference will be held February 28-March 3 in Anchorage, AK with the theme of “Making Sense of Problems and Persevering Through Them”.  Don’t miss the opportunity to learn from strong educators, and from the mushers themselves.  For more information on this conference click here.

*Photo credits: Battle Dawgs and Rick Casillo

Into the Wild with Musher Monica Zappa

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Iditarod clay diorama – complete with a husky, the northern lights, and paw prints in the snow

What do mushers see on the trail?  In art classes, the Iditarod and the study of Alaska and the Arctic have been a special project this year.  The students at Eanes Elementary School researched the geographic landscape and animals found along the trail and created amazing clay dioramas to represent what they found.   The results are stunning!unnamed-8

The question about certain polar animals always comes up when learning about Alaska.  Many times, students, and even adults, make the mistake of thinking that penguins live at the North Pole.  

Erik Brooks, the artist and illustrator, has written the perfect book to solve this mystery!  Polar Opposites is a lovely children’s picture book about a polar bear and a penguin who are friends and pen pals.  It talks about their respective homes at the North and South Poles and really helps students learn the difference once and for all.  Our dioramas were penguin free, and with a little research, students had the opportunity to learn about other unique Arctic creatures and landforms.

For help and insight into this special project, I turned to Iditarod musher Monica Zappa.  Monica lives in the remote Caribou Hills of Kasilof, Alaska, and her passion for nature and conservation is well known and respected.  Monica shared a video of her morning salmon and turkey snack time at her kennel…but with a special visitor.  A bald eagle flies in each morning hoping for a treat, much to the delight of her beloved dog team.  Will the eagle snatch the treat away from Dweezil, her lead dog?  Watch and find out:

 

 

Although this is a typical morning for Monica, it certainly seems extraordinary to me!  Her video was wonderful inspiration for this unique and thoughtful project.  Our students worked closely with our art teachers, Erin McElroy and Caitlin Maher, to recreate their Alaskan landscape scenes with clay, art tools, paint, and a lot of love.  We learned a lot about what an Iditarod musher sees and experiences along the trail in the remote wilderness.

It is so easy to bring the study of the Iditarod into any classroom.  This is a beautiful project that integrates the Last Great Race on Earth® and the study of wild Alaska into an art and research project.  When we finished, our students displayed their dioramas in a touring gallery display.  The next step is to allow students to tell a story about their dioramas in a narrative form or an expository research project in Writer’s Workshop.  This would also be wonderful for a companion poem with each Arctic scene.  The possibilities are endless!

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Monica Zappa has had a very adventurous life, inspired by her parents who were both mushers.  It was her father’s dream to run the Iditarod, and now she is fulfilling that dream for him with her third Iditarod this year.  Monica has degrees in meteorology and geography, and when she is not mushing, her main occupation is commercial fishing.  She is passionate about protecting Alaska’s wild salmon and the pristine waters of Bristol Bay.  She is truly a conservation advocate for her state!

How’d They Do That?

Check out the steps below to easily create your own Arctic clay dioramas:

 

Find out more about Team Zappa on their website:

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http://teamzappa.com

www.erikbrooks.com

Into the Wild – Arctic Diorama Lesson Plan

Want to know more about Monica Zappa and other 2016 Iditarod mushers and their teams?  The name says it all.  The ULTIMATE INSIDER ultimate-school-300x300 gives a school access to everything!  All of the benefits of the INSIDER VIDEO combined with the ability to “Track the Pack” with the GPS INSIDER!  Access to all of the commercial-free video.  Spotlight up to 5 of your favorite mushers and receive email alerts when they enter and leave a checkpoint.

HIGHLIGHTS:

  • GPS Tracker
  • Commercial-Free access to all video content
  • Highlight 5 Mushers with email alerts

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Follow my journey this year as 2016 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail™. We have partnered with Skype as a virtual field trip experience, and I will be sending recorded video messages daily along the trail to classrooms around the world.  Sign up for a free Skype account first, and then join the “Iditarod Classroom Club” to follow along.  Remember, you must have a Skype account first, or you only be in my club for 24 hours as a guest!  Click the link below:

Iditarod Classroom Club

Iditarod S-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d Art

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An old calendar gains new life in the Iditarod classroom

As the year comes to a close, we have been organizing, cleaning up, and preparing our classroom for the new year.  One of these tasks involves bringing down our 2015 Iditarod calendar from the wall.  Old calendars can be recycled into a fantastic art project I like to call “stretched art” using basic art supplies and a lot of creativity.

Optical illusions hold a special fascination for my students.  I have a collection of these types of books in my classroom that are continually checked out and shared throughout the week.  I decided to combine our interest in this visual phenomenon with our calendar art project in 10 easy steps.

Step One:

Share optical illusion books from the library with the class and discuss the visual trickery involved.  Some of my favorites are:

Xtreme Illusions by National Geographic

Optical Illusions by DK Publishing

Magic Eye: A New Way of Looking at the World by Marc Grossman

Step Two:

Tear apart your out-of-date calendars, and let your students choose their favorite month and picture for the project. Turn it over and lay it on a larger piece of standard, white construction paper; any length will do.  Lay the picture exactly in the bottom left-hand corner of the paper.

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Step Three:

Using the top of the calendar as a guide, draw a line all the way across the top of the white paper.  Cut off the excess strip and recycle it.

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Step Four:

Use the daily grid lines on the back as a guide, and have students simply cut the calendar page into long strips.  I find it best to number the strips across the top, so they can be put back in order easily when they are flipped over.  For a mathematical challenge, you can require different measurements across the page with a ruler.

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Step Five:

Turn over the strips and make sure they are in the correct visual order.  Keep the first strip on the far-left side, then stretch the last strip all the way to the end on the right.

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Step Six:

Now simply stretch the other strips equally between the ends of the paper.  When you have them evenly spaced apart, glue each strip down.

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Step Seven:

Now the fun begins!  Students should use a regular pencil to draw in the missing picture between the strips first, then add color.  Use any medium you want to fill in the blank spaces between the strips as accurately as you can.  We found colored pencils and oil pastels worked well together.

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Step Eight:

Oil pastels bring a bright pop of color to the design.  They also add a little realism to the optical illusion when students blend the color with their fingers.

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Step Nine:

It’s helpful to let students see their project from across the room as they work.  Viewed up close the picture may look a bit strange, resulting in some giggles from the class.  Held up a few feet away, the optical illusion comes together, and they can see their added design brings the strips into a cohesive image, resulting in many “oohs” and “aahhs”.

Step Ten:

The stretched art project makes a wonderful bulletin board display in the classroom.  I used a black background to make the illusions stand out for the viewer.

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For an extra challenge, have students remove more strips to leave larger empty spaces.  More creativity and problem solving will be needed to fill in the blank areas with their drawings.

This activity is also a great beginning for a writing lesson.  My students wrote similes and metaphors about their pictures since we are learning about figurative language in class.  An Iditarod themed narrative story is a great choice or a how-to procedural text about the entire art process: the possibilities are endless.  We had great fun creating our optical illusions, but the Iditarod stretched art project has the added bonus of recycling and reusing obsolete calendars destined for the trashcan.

Iditarod S-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d Art Lesson Plan

View our slideshow to see our gallery of Iditarod illusions:

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Get your gear for the 2016 Last Great Race on Earth™.  Be prepared for the upcoming school semester by ordering your new Iditarod calendar from the online store now.

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Later this week we will celebrate the holidays while learning about some special features of the Iditarod race.  We will be comparing and contrasting two books with a unique take on the Christmas classic, The Night Before Christmas by Clement C. Moore.

Musher’s Night Before Christmas, by Tricia Brown, tells the tale of a team of determined Iditarod huskies who must help Santa deliver gifts to Nome during a snowstorm.  Texas Night Before Christmas, by James Rice, is a Lone Star State version of the classic tale with southwest themed imagery; cowboys, cowgirls, and a sled pulled by eight longhorns.

The 2016 Winter Conference for Educators is an amazing week for educators around the country to come together and learn best teaching practices surrounding the theme of the Iditarod.  Check out the Iditarod site for more information about this unique professional development opportunity.

I will be joined this year by a few talented teachers from my school, Eanes Elementary, here in Austin, Texas.  We will be sharing STEM and STEAM hands-on lessons based upon the Iditarod theme with conference attendees.  We hope to see you there!

A Turkey on the Trail

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Turkeys in disguise while training for the 2016 Iditarod

In honor of Thanksgiving this year, my class disguised paper turkeys as husky dogs and mushers preparing for the 2016 Iditarod.  They wrote about their plans for escape from the farm in first person narratives. This time-honored school tradition involves a lot of creativity, humor, and great writing.  What a perfect way to save a turkey from a horrible fate.  The farmer would not suspect a thing!

We brainstormed other ideas for our turkey disguises as well.  How about a moose on the trail?  Some of my students created polar bears, and snowflake disguises for their turkeys.  All of these creative ideas have a great tie-in to the study of Alaska and the Iditarod race.

If you are a teacher with an Iditarod Insider subscription, now is a great time to watch the musher videos preparing for the race.  This is a great source of inspiration for the writing project.

A Turkey on the Trail Narrative

Turkey

Turkey in Disguise

The Turkey on the Trail Lesson Plan

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Make your turkey digital by using an app like Chatterpix for Kids to create a voice-over for an image of their finished project.  Students can record themselves reading their plans of escape in 1st person that allows the beak of the turkey to move.  This can be shared with parents or embedded on a teacher website.

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The 2016 Winter Conference for Educators is an amazing week for teachers around the country to come together and learn best teaching practices surrounding the theme of the Iditarod.  Check out the Iditarod site for more information about this unique professional development opportunity.

I will be joined this year by a few talented teachers from my school, Eanes Elementary, here in Austin, Texas.  We will be sharing STEM and STEAM hands-on lessons based upon the Iditarod theme with conference attendees.  We hope to see you there!

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Fantasy Iditarod Draft

Start your Fantasy Teams this week

Tori says, “Start your Fantasy Teams this week.”

If you enjoy following the Iditarod, you will enjoy it more by following the race with a Fantasy Iditarod Team. Just before I left my students in Iowa, we held our own draft for Iditarod mushers. With their team names created and their teams selected, my students are geared up for the race to begin.

Before draft day the students did a little research and used critical thinking skills to help them form their teams. Each group in my classroom had to choose a name for their team. Some creative team names were, The Lead Dogs, No Place Like Nome, The Mush Potatoes, Team Pawsome. Each team in the class would be drafting five total mushers; 3 main mushers, 1 female musher, and 1 rookie musher.

The main mushers on the team can be any type of musher; veteran, rookie, female, it’s their choice. The female musher obviously has to be a female musher. If one of their main mushers is a female musher, they need to choose a different female musher. It is the same concept with the rookie musher, if one of their main mushers is a rookie, they need a different rookie. In the end, each team will have five different mushers.

Along the trail teams will earn points for arriving at checkpoints. We are using three checkpoints and the finish as places to earn points. Our first checkpoint to earn points in Tanana. If one of your mushers arrives first in Tanana you earn 10 points, second will earn 9 points, third will earn 8 points, and so on. Our second checkpoint is the halfway point, Huslia. The same scoring system applies in Huslia. The third checkpoint is Unalakleet. The same scoring system will apply in Unalakleet. The point system will change when the mushers finish in Nome. View the point system below:

Main Musher

1st place – 50 points

2nd place – 44 points

3rd place – 37 points

4th place – 29 points

5th place – 21 pointsDSC_2009

6th place – 20 points

7th place – 19 points

Etc.

Female Musher

1st female – 30 points

2nd female – 25 points

3rd female – 15 points

4th female – 5 points

Rookie Musher

1st rookie – 30 points

2nd rookie – 25 points

3rd rookie – 15 points

4th rookie – 5 points

Red Lantern winner will earn 70 points. The Red Lantern winner is the musher who crosses the finish line last. When discussing this winner with your students talk about the importance of just finishing such a challenging race and persevering through obstacles faced along the way.

My students took about a day and a half to research and make their lists of choices with back up choices in case their musher was already picked. On draft day to determine which team drew first we drew team names out of a hat. There are seven groups in each of my classes and we had five rounds in the draft. The first pick in first hour was Aliy Zirkle. The first pick in second hour was also Aliy Zirkle. Fifth hour picked Jeff King as their first pick.

As students were deciding on their picks I heard them strategizing. A few teams were trying to get a couple of top 10 finishers as well as someone they think would win the Red Lantern. Teams were coming up with strategies that would give them the most points, not necessarily their favorite mushers. Keep this in mind when picking your teams.

We created charts for each class to keep track of our points which we hung outside of the classroom. Each day during the race students will be tracking the mushers and when points are earned they will update the charts. I am bringing back prizes from Alaska for the winning teams.

In addition to playing Fantasy Iditarod in your class with your students, you may want to hold a draft with some friends. It is an exciting way to follow the race. The countdown is on, one week until the race. Get started with Fantasy Iditarod this week. You may want to think about holding off on your draft day until Friday of this week. Thursday, March 5, is the Musher Drawing Banquet. At the banquet the mushers will draw their starting order. If your class chooses to keep track of points at early checkpoints, starting order may make a difference.

 Fantasy Iditarod Lesson Plan

 Fantasy Iditarod Form

The Coat

“The journey of success can be a lonely long walk, blurry and stormy on every side but learn to enjoy the journey anyway.” ~ Bernard Kelvin Clive

“The journey of success can be a lonely long walk, blurry and stormy on every side but learn to enjoy the journey anyway.” ~ Bernard Kelvin Clive

One of the most asked questions I hear from people is, “What are you going to wear to stay warm?” I have to laugh a little bit, because it has been colder here in Iowa than it has been in Alaska. Yesterday morning, February 19, my school had a 2-hour late start due to cold weather. The temperature was approximately 25 degrees below zero Fahrenheit with the wind chill. The temperature yesterday in Fairbanks got up to 22 degrees Fahrenheit. Iowa also had a big snowstorm a couple weeks ago blanketing us with close to a foot of snow. Many parts of the original Iditarod trail are feeling the absence of snow, and now the absence of the Iditarod. Due to lack of snow and poor trail conditions race officials have moved the race restart up north to Fairbanks.

Regardless of the recent warmer temperatures, I am prepared for bitter temperatures.

1. Feet: It is critical that your feet stay warm. While out on the trail I will be wearing a pair of well insulated Baffin boots. These boots are perfect for arctic temperatures as they are rated to 148 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. Along with my warm boots, I will be wearing comfy, cozy, wool socks. There is nothing like a pair of wool socks to keep your feet warm and dry.

2. Legs: My main pair of pants are The North Face waterproof, insulated ski pants. I will have to beef up my pants with some baselayers and possibly some fleece pants.

3. Upper body: Just like my legs, I’m going to be using baselayers to start off. I am bringing along some Dri-Fit  tops and a couple fleeces. My “undercoat” will be a Patagonia down jacket. Last, but certainly not least, is “The Coat.” A goose-down parka with several pockets and a fur-ruff hood. Terrie Hanke, 2006 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail™, sewed several patches and reflectors on the coat. After the coat arrived at my house, I had my 2015 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail™ patched sewed on.

4. Head, neck, hands: On my hands I will start with a pair of liner gloves followed by the biggest mittens I have ever seen. I’m sure my hands will stay warm. My neck will stay warm with a gator which I can pull up over my face, too. I will not likely be stepping outside without my stocking hat.

5. Sleepy time: The infamous traveling sleeping bag will be my bed while out on the trail. Each year the Teacher on the Trail creates a patch to be sewed on to the official teacher sleeping bag. I’ve already zipped myself up in it a few times, seems warm and comfortable. There are countless stories the sleeping bag could tell us all. The amount of history and people this sleeping bag has met is remarkable. I look forward to adding to the rich history.

Photo Feb 19, 9 02 30 PM6. The Patch: When deciding on my patch I knew I wanted it to incorporate both the Iditarod and my school. I came up with an idea, but I am the farthest thing from an artist. I have a friend that works with me at school that just so happens to be an artist/designer. I showed her what I wanted and she ran with the idea. Everything I wanted she included, and then some. Staring at each other are my middle school’s logo and a husky. Our middle school logo is an Indian head, we are the Camanche Indians, with CMSPRIDE and two pencils in the place of feathers. If you concentrate on the black part of the husky you can see blended in his hair is the word Iditarod. Also included is a musher with his dogs and a mountainous background. I love it. After Liesl finished the final design, I went to my friend Colin at Adcraft Printwear. They turned Liesl’s unique design into an incredible patch.

Classroom Ideas:

1. You are going to the Ceremonial Start in Anchorage on March, 7. Make a list of everything you will wear. Plan on being outside for about 4 hours or more. Check the extended forecast for Anchorage.

2. You are heading up to Fairbanks for the Restart on March 9. Make a list of everything you will wear. Plan on being outside for about 4 hours or more. Check the extended forecast for Fairbanks.

3. Your teacher has been selected as the next Iditarod Teacher on the Trail™. Design him/her a patch that can be added to the sleeping bag.